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The Pfizer Foundation Announced 20 Grants to Assist NGO’s to Tackle AMR and Infectious Diseases

The Pfizer Foundation announced 20 grants to assist non-governmental organizations (NGOs), nonprofits and social enterprises address critical health challenges associated to infectious illnesses, including the rising risk of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), in some of the world’s most susceptible communities. Beneficiaries of the one-year Global Health Innovation Grants (GHIG) include companions in 12 low- and middle-income countries that will each receive the US $100,000, for a total investment this year of US $2 million by The Pfizer Foundation.

Globally, infectious diseases are accountable for an estimated 8.4 million deaths annually and are a leading cause of death worldwide, notably among young children and marginalized populations in underserved communities, typically perpetuating the cycle of poverty. It’s estimated that the rise of AMR, which happens when pathogens evolve to withstand the impact of even the most potent medicines, now accounts for about 700,000 of those deaths. Without any action, this number could reach ten million deaths per year by 2050 and will cost the world the estimated US $100 trillion in lost productivity in the same amount of time. The World Health Organization included AMR in its list of ten threats to global health in 2019.

The Pfizer Foundation’s flagship GHIG program is accomplished in partnership with Innovations in Healthcare (IiH), a nonprofit group hosted by Duke University. The GHIG program consolidates grant investments with technical help to help accelerate world health innovations by giving partners the autonomy to navigate the distinctive and fluid challenges they face of their local – and often last-mile – communities. The Pfizer Foundation and IiH work collectively to analyze results from each partner program to build on critical learnings and pivot approaches when needed.

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Dale Martinez

Dale possesses an engineering degree in Electronics from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She is the sole contributor at the Healthcare IT column. Before opting to write, Dale worked at major firms such as Microsoft, Amazon, GE, Raytheon, and so on. She possesses vast knowledge about a variety of fields like IT, IoT, Telecommunications, Health Dialysis, photovoltaic, and many others. Dale is also a ballet dancer.

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