Medicine

Disposing of Unused Prescription Drugs Is an Issue Says Pharmacy Regulators

As America confronts with an opioid epidemic, it has turn into even more important to dispose of your unused prescription drugs properly, one pharmacist says.

Many people do not realize that merely throwing away unused medicines or flushing them down the toilet is very harmful, stated Karen Youmbi, manager of pharmacy regulatory surveillance and outpatient pharmacies at Cedars-Sinai, in Los Angeles.

Individuals affected by substance abuse disorders might scour trash cans for medication, and flushed substances can find yourself within the water supply,” she defined in a Cedars Sinai news release.

Keeping unused medication is also dangerous as a result of others might get their hands on them, together with youngsters.

The most conventional prescription medicines that lead to extra doses embrace these for pain, chronic heart issues, anxiety, or depression, in keeping with Youmbi.

It is best to learn the remedy’s label and observe any disposal directions, she suggested.

Find a medication take-back location, equivalent to an area pharmacy, the place you may anonymously deposit unused drugs in a dropbox.

Check the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s website for a nearby take-back location, or contact your native sheriff’s division or space trash and recycling program for different choices.

If there aren’t any disposal directions on the label and you can’t discover a take-again program, here is what you need to do. Grind up the leftover tablets, and blend them with used coffee grounds, grime, or cat litter. This makes it more durable for youngsters, pets, or individuals wanting by trash to find the medicines.

Put the combination in a can with a lid or a sealable bag to keep away from spillage.

Recycle the plastic pill bottles; however, remember to take away the prescription label or scratch out personal information to protect your privacy and keep away from identity theft.

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Felicia Broderick

Felicia is the head of the column Medical Devices. An Electronics Engineer from the University of Michigan, Felicia, before opting for technical writing as a profession, worked at firms such as SEH, Leviton, etc. In 2016, she quit her job at Leviton and started taking writing projects as a freelancer. Gradually, she developed an interest in technical writing, and now leading a column here.

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